Welcome to Project Dalek

You need to be a member in order to access our content.

 

Click Here To Join!

 

For instant access to the plans and all Forum features, choose Active Membership.

threegringos

Threegringos' NDP

49 posts in this topic

I've decided on a NDP as my first build for numerous reasons; size, stature, those raised skirt sections, the fact that they are the most arrogant Daleks... did I mention size?

Also, I feel that they got a false start. I wasn't a fan of the iDalek colours and the hunchback profile, however I think the reworked version from Asylum of the Daleks is a huge improvement. The side view is less "hunchy" and the toned-down colours look more "Daleky" in my opinion.

So that's what I'm aiming for... on with the build...

Something I haven't seen used on this forum yet is Extruded polystyrene sheet (XPS) Foam. The Blue (or Pink) stuff used to insulate buildings. I happened to have some 2'x8'x1/2"s sheets in my garage, so I thought I would give it a try. If it doesn't work, then all it will cost me is time... and dented pride.

Foam is certainly easy to work with. You only need a sharp knife to cut it. It can be tacked together using hot glue, and more permanently glued using "No-Nails" type glue designed for foam. It can even be sanded - although that is definitely not something you want to do too much of. That dust gets everywhere (Think of super-lightweight MDF dust, which gets attracted to every surface - even the undersides of work surfaces).

I cut some cardboard templates from the plans, and this is what I currently have sitting in my garage...

post-24088-0-17691700-1412096407_thumb.j post-24088-0-81124900-1412096408_thumb.j

My plan is to coat the foam in something called "StyroSpray" which is a polyurea coating, and despite the name, can be applied by brush. It will harden the foam enough to protect it against bumps and knocks. However, I do plan to create molds/moulds from this and go the Fiberglass/Fibreglass route (you'll have to excuse the mixed spellings - I am a Brit Expat living in Canada so I tend to alternate between spellings with no consistency whatsoever).

That's all for now.

I am going on a canoe trip to Algonquin national park so I'll be doing my best to avoid being eaten by bears for the next few days.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Last week, I received a shiny new pair of Moflash lenses. Many thanks to PDF Member LowKey for shipping these all the way from Finland.

post-24088-0-14319000-1413294662_thumb.j

Over the weekend, I managed to spend some time on the shoulder section. This section is certainly more complicated that it initially appears.

I planned to start from the bottom layer and work my way up, however I was unable to determine the exact shape of the bottom layer from the plans.

So I decided to start with the Gun box and see where that led me.

post-24088-0-58121000-1413294969_thumb.j

I sketched out half of the base layer, cut it out and then traced it to form the second half. Add some hot glue and this is what I ended up with.

post-24088-0-55262900-1413295223_thumb.j

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Shoulders are underway...

I junked the first base layer as it looked out of proportion (that will teach me not to try short-cuts) and transferred the top-view of the shoulders from the plans onto cardboard using grid lines.

post-24088-0-89223000-1414071234_thumb.j

In my mind, I broke the shoulder section into 6 layers:

Layer 1: The base - this is the layer that sits on top of the Skirt

Layer 2: The widest point of the shoulders

Layer 3 & 4: The bottom and top of the slot

Layer 5: The top of the gunbox

Layer 6: The area that meets the neck.

Using the cardboard templates, I cut the 2nd layer first (The largest one), then the bottom layer, and then the 5th layer (the one at the top of the gun box). I glues these together with the gunbox at the correct heights to get an idea of the basic shape.

post-24088-0-73352700-1414071247_thumb.j

Next, using coarse sandpaper on a board, I added a chamfer to the 2nd layer, aiming for a straight line between the bottom of layer 2 and the top of layer 5.

Then, lots of triangles were added to flesh out the shape between layers 1&2, and 2&5. Each triangle had a slot at the correct height and depth to accommodate layers 3 and 4.

post-24088-0-88777600-1414071259_thumb.j

Finally, I added the top section (layer 6) and fleshed it out using the triangle method.

post-24088-0-92899000-1414071268_thumb.jpost-24088-0-88812100-1414071279_thumb.j

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dalek Clara in Seattle, Washington, USA, is a mostly foam NSD build, but her construction is not outlined in the detail you are using.

Your build is looking great! I'll watch for further progress.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice work so far. I'm really interested in how this build progresses, as I hope to build a TDP (not too different from an NDP) in the near future. I like your use of basic household materials for building such a complex dalek. The New and True Dalek Paradigms are the most difficult to build in my opinion. I greatly admire you for taking on such a large project.The shoulders troubled me, until I saw your design, and I then I thought, "Why didn't I think of this before? :wacko: ". Great job, looking forward to more! :)

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the kind comments.

Progress has been slow over the last couple of months, mainly due to the cold weather.

Here are a couple of photos showing the shoulders in their current state. All of the sloping edges have been "skinned" with card stock.

post-24088-0-95638700-1424268802_thumb.jpost-24088-0-93145900-1424268810_thumb.jpost-24088-0-06933500-1424268826_thumb.j

The process was simply a case of offering up the card to the shoulders, applying hot glue to hold in place, and then trimming off the excess card with a sharp knife. Sounds simple, but it seemed to take forever!

Next step - The dreaded neck!!

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What is the neck going to be made out of? Also, I really like the shoulders, they're very screen accurate. :)

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi I'm quite interested in this strospray, I've looked at some video's and it seems to be quite flexible is there a way that it could be made to stay stiff, perhaps back it with some cardboard, any help would be much appreciated thanks :)

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the comments L'chaim. I have already attempted to produce the neck using the same method as the shoulders - foam circles and lots of triangles. However, it doesn't look quite right at the moment. It might improve once I get the card stock applied to fill in the angles, but now I'm thinking that this method is going to be a real pain in terms of adding all of the cutouts. I will need to cut 144 sets of slots (36 per layer) and fill these with something to provide a bit of depth.

I might go with a negative mould similar to the way that domes are usually constructed, but using separate moulds for each layer of the neck. I will have to wait until warmer weather before I can attempt that though.

The original prop necks were made from layers of MDF, but that's going to be incredibly heavy!

I purchased the foam from Rona here in Canada. However, the pink foam from Home Depot would work just as well.

supermart - I don't have any first hand experience with styrospray - it looks interesting, but I agree that it may not be the toughest finish. I am considering applying a fiberglass cloth and epoxy resin skin, then smoothing over with car filler (Bondo).

Note - Polyester resin, and EPS foam are enemies. The foam will melt on contact with the styrene in Polyester resin.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great work so far! Can't wait for more.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The fender will be made using the same method as the skirt. However, some weight-bearing reinforcement (probably plywood) will be required underneath.

I plan to do the dome using the negative plaster mould / fiberglass technique. Although plans tend to change, so don't hold me to that!

Best of luck with your TDP!

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks! I think that the mold idea is probably the best. Unfortunately, I'm not good with fiberglass, so I may have to ask someone here on Project Dalek to help me make the dome. I can't wait to see what you do for the neck, as I'm concerned about making it. It's not that different from the TDP's. What part are you working on right now? :)

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The winter snow is melting! This weekend I tentatively stepped out into my garage to tidy-up the winter-related carnage.

The skirt has taken a bit of beating, as it has been sharing a home with a wet/snowy/icy minivan on a regular basis. Car doors have been opened into it, and muddy slush has sprayed all over it. Nothing too serious that a bit of hot glue and soapy water won't fix though. I'm impressed that the damage wasn't more extensive!

post-24088-0-19218200-1426511329_thumb.j

Over the weekend I built myself a flat work surface to make it easier to work on things. I made it slightly larger than the base of the Dalek. I also made up the top and bottom surfaces of the base section. These were temporarily glued together so that I could match them up.

post-24088-0-30523700-1426512035_thumb.j

Then I got to work with the sandpaper and rounded off the edges.

post-24088-0-54474700-1426512052_thumb.jpost-24088-0-15348200-1426512102_thumb.j

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now