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Wayne Venomous

Wayne's Ironside NSD

31 posts in this topic

Decided on new year's day to finally start my Dalek build. I have ZERO budget for this build. I won't be buying in any pre-made parts for the simple reason I can't afford them. Everything will be made from stuff from scrap I've got lying around, stuff I've liberated from skips and anything appropriate I can find at Poundland etc that I can modify.

Not a lot to show at the moment, but I've started constructing the frame of the skirt; this is the top and bottom of the skirt frame:
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I'm not totally sure about the small child propulsion system though....

Also made a start on the individual panels of the skirt - I've marked out the two front panels including the Hemis here:
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The Hemi is half a plumbing ball float for a "slimline" toilet cistern which according to the PDF Dalek plans are about 8mm too big (overall diameter). However, I don't think it's that noticable and given how cheap I can get these for (cousin is a manager at a plumber's merchant!) they're certainly worth a try. At the very least I can use them as moulds for smaller Hemis.

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What a great way to start 2011, build a dalek. Be good to see an ironside build, as they're still a pretty rare thing. Always good to see different materials used too, some really good ideas come out when you have to try something out of the ordinary.

If you mark out the skirt panels before you have built the frame, make sure you cut them out a bit oversize. As accurate as the plans are, you'll always get little variations in every build. Once you have the frame done, you can test-fit the panels and trim them as needed. It's easy to trim down thin MDF with a knife or by sanding, and much easier than having to fill in gaps if the panels come up a bit short.

All the best with your build.

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Thanks jonnymb!

I'm a classic car restorer by trade so I did consider using sheet steel but the current price of metal plus the weight issue put me off, plus I had some hardboard left over when I built a TARDIS for my Daughter. I will probably be making the dome from steel when I eventually get to that stage, or if it's too heavy I'll use it as a mould. The Ironside appealed to me because I like the military vehicle green colour and any unfinished areas can be covered up with some green canvas for now. I've considered a new paradigm 2010 Dalek but in my own colour scheme with a few modifications such as electroluminescent detailing of the panels (think Tron!) but I think that's a distant future project. I did wonder about making the panels slightly oversize and you've confirmed what I suspected. At work I used to dread it when a customer would give me their car complete with hideous quality repair panels that they've managed to get cheap from Ebay. Now I just refuse to use any pre-made repair panels and make my own panels with plenty of spare material.

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Build frame first! Build frame first! Soooooo much easierand you'll be able to 'tailor-make ' your panels to the exact size :) I always like to read about a Dalek being built with NO MONEY as its always how I try to make mine, even when I am quite flush ( any Southern Jessies reading this, That means when one has more than adequate funds) ;)

It'll bring out your inner resources and inventiveness and you'll be much much prouder of your completed Dalek than if you'd simply thrown your cheque book at it, Good luck and happy building :)

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Well, here's an interesting thing I discovered today, I attend college one day a week doing welding and I noticed something interesting on the huge 415 volt 3 phase electrical plugs that provide power to the welders;

post-12081-030041500 1294166540_thumb.jp

Notice the large collar with the ribs around the side? Think Dalek eye! ;) And there happened to be a broken collar on the floor so I acquired it and I can confirm it's about 10.8cm (slightly larger than the PDF plans of 10.56cm) but the width is spot on at 2.5cm! I know the one in the picture has a "lip" around one end of the collar but the one I've managed to acquire doesn't have this. I can't tell if it fell off a plug made by MK electricals or RS components

- I'll see if I can find out.

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Bit more progress. Not as much as I would have liked. I've got some panels cut out roughly and a couple more marked up:
post-12081-030922500 1294698649_thumb.jp

Making a paper template first works wonders, using either wall lining paper or Ikea do big rolls of paper for their kiddies drawing board. Here's a paper template being positioned and my little helper providing some weight to it:
post-12081-098763000 1294698901_thumb.jp

I've been marking the positions of the hemis and although they look ok on all the other panels, I'm not happy with the way they look on the rear panel (panel 6 on the PDF plans):
post-12081-022530000 1294698811_thumb.jp
The fact the hemis are slightly larger seems to have caused this problem. Think I'll relocate them so they're slightly further away from the edge. I'm hoping this doesn't cause too many proplems with the larger side panel with two rows of hemis (panel 4 on the PDF plans)

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Hi Wayne

A little nudge away from the edge will see you right I'm sure. But I wouldn't get to hung up on marking the hemi positions until the skirt is assembled and the edges sanded to their final size. You may find things even more slightly adrift if you take the current markings out as being final. I, and a few others, usually use a simple jig to mark the horizontal positions. This consists of a wood batten that sits across the skirt top. Attached to one end, at right angles, is a second batten.

This has a pen/pencil fitted to it with the point aimed at the skirt. Measure from the bottom of the cross batten to the pen/pencil tip set, clamp and then mark the first row of each panel. Set to the next row height and mark all the panels again etc etc. Then deal with the vertical centre lines having measured each panel again to get the best line.

regards

Fenris

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I agree with Fenris,

once the panels are set together on th skirt you may find a few gaps that need filling and sanding and the hemis may be a few mm out from your original positioning. You may also find that the heights may vary between the hemis. It's really difficult to get perfect joins first time, they'll always need a little filler. So I'd try all the panels on the skirt frame before you thnk about drilling any holes through the skirt panels. Mine were surface mounted but I did find a little drift in the positions first time. I didn't drill any holes until the skirt panels were fixed and fibreglassed onto the frame. I measured the approx distance at the top and bottom of the skirt and used a straight bit of wood to draw the vertical, once that is done then measure the centres. In my case that as it.

post-2-098487700 1294787864_thumb.jpgpost-9184-015711000 1294733825_thumb.jpg

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Thanks guys! :)

I'm a total newbie to Dalek builds so any tips and tricks like this go a long way! My mind is always worrying about the next few steps hence why I was pondering the position of the hemis. I shall heed your advice and wait until the skirt is constructed before worrying about hemi postion. Just received two massive orders at work so it could be a few days before I get to do any more to this build.

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Skirt panels all cut out! Thought I'd gaffa tape them together temporarily to see how the proportions are:

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Not as bad as I was expecting. The frame construction, sanding down and fillering should help considerably. And my Daughter doing the obligatory "Davros reaching for the self-destruct button" pose:

post-12081-0-29229300-1295194073_thumb.j
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It'll get there. I reckon the important bit is going to be the frame for the skirt once you get the panels mounted it's all the fun of the filling and sanding.

One thing to keep in mind is that once that skirt is together, it's the biggest bit and it'll be sitting around for the rest of the build. But it's great to store stuff inside. ;)

Keep it up, we need more local Daleks.

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I know the done thing is to construct the frame first before the panels but I was struggling to visualise it. Now I've got the panels roughly arranged in the right place I can start planning the frame properly. I've decided the skirt will be in two sections, split from the sides as there's no way it will fit through the living room door.

The red line in this pic will be the split:

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I figured it would be less noticable than if it was from the front and there's various things I can use to seal the gap (been thinking VW Beetle wing beading as I've got tonnes of this stuff!) Oh yeah, forgot to mention I'll be redoing that rear panel (the one on the left) as it had a bit of an accident when I was cutting it out.

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I now have an electric wheelchair which was very kindly donated by a friend of Splik's. :)

I've no idea how old it is, but it certainly wouldn't look out of place in the film Carry On Doctor!

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This thing weighs an absolute tonne! Even though I'm not exactly a 7 stone weakling, it took two of us to lift it into the boot of my car and as I was by myself when I got it home it took me nearly 10 minutes to get it out of the car and into the back room. It did work when we put it in the car but it's now stopped working.

So, today I start dismantling it (plus my Daughter keeps asking me to "build our Dalek" and wanted to help!) so I started by removing the seat and having a look at what is powering it:

post-12081-0-58243300-1298385716_thumb.j

Yes, that is two car batteries! None of your modern lightweight batteries here.

They show a manufacture date of December 1997 but a quick test reveals they're actually fully charged and in good condition. Also, I can see one of the connectors has come loose, so I reconnect it and it starts working again.

Although it is working, it's too big for the Dalek base and far too heavy. So a size and weight loss program is in order here. First of all I've decided to make a custom chassis for it which will allow the drive wheels to be centrally mounted for a better turning circle and probably have castors front and rear for stability. The idea will be to make everything fit below the seat as compact as possible.

The car batteries have to go as the whole wheelchair is a fraction of the weight without them. This is where I'm curious as to what sort of power to weight ratio they gave. Okay they've got a reasonable capacity of 36Ah but I do wonder how much of this power was used up by just moving the weight of the batteries around in the first place.

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You can't really see in the photos above but the tyres are flat and have pretty much had it. After talking to a friend about his Dalek, he recommends solid tyres anyway so new wheels and tyres will be installed. Incidently, the rear wheels have a manufacturing date of 1987 on them. However, they're clearly a later addition.

I'm very impressed with the motor/gear units as they seem way over-engineered for the purpose. Some good solid aluminium hubs too, which again look like a later addition.

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Hi Wayne,

I have to say your 'car' batteries look like fairly standard wheelchair batteries to me. Most motorised builds I've seen have kept the standard batteries and some have additional batteries to power other functions. A motorised base including skirt, fender, seat and other parts will be very heavy. Most buildsers I've seen remove the batteries before loading into a vehicle unless they have a low floor trailer to drive onto.

Your wheels look smart and rather unusual.

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Interesting. To me these look exactly like Ford Fiesta/Escort batteries. I've seen mobility scooters in the past so I was expecting similar size batteries.

I still think there's a lot of scope for improving the power to weight ratio, though. I shall experiment.

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